Council weighs in on labor negotiations with Police and approves two moratoriums: 4.10.17 Council meeting recap

After a spring break, Council was back in session on April 10th to address several items, some of which were emergency moratoriums.

First, Council voted 6-1 (Fagan opposed) to establish a “decision matrix” for City staff to use during the scoping phase of construction projects specifically for Centers and Corridors and Targeted Investment areas. The matrix will help capital programs staff weigh the input of neighborhoods, businesses, adjoining neighbors and City Planning documents when they are doing initial design of a project in key areas of our City slated for growth. These areas are denser with a mixture of businesses and residents, making the construction projects more complicated and requires more input prior to applying for grants. The need for this has been driven by the concerns over the Monroe St project, which was driven by neighborhood planning, but did not receive specific feedback on design prior to going out for funding. I’m confident this matrix will be a valuable tool for future capital planning and allow all voices to be heard earlier in the process.

Council also enacted a new policy that addresses how asset forfeiture dollars can be spent by the Police Dept., voting 5-2 (Fagan and Stratton against) to requiring approval by the Council for how the dollars are spent. I voted in support of this ordinance, brought forward by CM Beggs, because I believe in transparency and in the Council being able to consider all sources of revenue when establishing our annual budget and strategic priorities.

Council unanimously adopted a letter to Mayor Condon outlining the City Council’s goals and objectives for the upcoming collective bargaining negotiations with the Police Guild. CM Kinnear worked hard to collect the priorities of all the Councilmembers and come up with a list of items, including improvements to police oversight and changes to overtime, that Council could all agree to. The negotiations have been stalled and Council hopes this letter clearly identifies our priorities so the Mayor can begin negotiations in good faith with the Guild.

Finally, there were two emergency moratoriums unanimously adopted by Council. These are items not normally noticed prior to the meeting because they address current planning and permitting and require a public hearing within 60 days. First, CM Kinnear brought forward a moratorium on demolition permits in the Browne’s Addition neighborhood in order to allow the Neighborhood Council and City to complete a historic overlay plan that supports infill growth, yet addresses the need to preserve the historic character of this beautiful neighborhood.

I brought forward a moratorium on issuing permits for off-premise signs (i.e. billboards) in the Center and Corridor zone of Historic Market St. in Hillyard. Normally, there are no new permits for off-premise signs allowed in Spokane in order to retain the character of neighborhoods and reduce sign clutter. However, there is an interesting clause in our sign code that allows billboards that are taken down due to a public works project to be relocated on the similar corridor. I recently became aware of this because of the North South Corridor development. Signs that used to be on Market St near the railroad tracks are potentially moving to the historic Market St. corridor — right on top of historic buildings. Two permits are already in the works. My concern is that this is not consistent with the pedestrian-oriented nature of this beautiful street and this moratorium allows City Planning to review this part of our code with the community. In the meantime, these billboards could still be relocated to the General Commercial areas of Market St north and south of the historic center.

Public Hearings on these two moratoriums will be held on Monday, May 22nd at our 6pm legislative session.